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npr8:

On April 15th last year, I was one of the last runners timed & scored. Over 4,000 runners behind me didn’t get to finish their race. On the one-month anniversary of the marathon, I got a tattoo on my right shoulder. It was one-part message to myself to “get back on the horse” and one-part message to those runners who didn’t get to finish. In just three weeks, many of them return to Boston, just like me. Still we rise. STILL WE RISE!

— Demi Clark

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.

Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.

A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, President Barack Obama, and more. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

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